My Column – Let me try to beat Project Fear at their own game

Project Fear tells us that life in post-EU Britain will be terrible in their dystopian, cleverly constructed worst-case scenarios for Brexit.

The ‘Remain’ campaigners even rely upon the suggestion that we know what life is like inside the European Union . Better, they imply, the devil you know than the devil you don’t.

They fake a virtue out of the current EU disasters, shrugging their shoulders with an ‘Ah well, at least it’s a known problem’.

No one ever really discusses the real risks involved with staying in the EU, however. I try to be measured and balanced in what I write, but today – as a one-off – let me play them at their own game. What might happen if we vote to remain in the EU?

Just days after the referendum, even Cameron’s so-called ‘deal’ is under threat. It was never legally binding in the first place. A couple of weeks after that, the Greek financial crisis rears its head once more as their EU-imposed austerity is unsustainable. There’s another round of talks over Greece exiting the euro.

Because Greece left it so long to exit, the cost of Grexit has risen enormously. This time there is no fudge and Greece eventually crashes out. The economies of the southern European nations take a massive hit; their investors fear they could be next. It has an impact across Europe, putting our economic recovery in jeopardy.

The migrant crisis continues apace, with moves to make sure the UK takes in more asylum claimants.

The EU doesn’t take into account the fact that we’re pretty much already the most densely populated country in Europe and our infrastructure struggles to cope with the influx.

Amongst the 100,000-plus people who come to the UK there are just a few who are bad apples. Something like the mass sexual assaults in Cologne happens here too. There’s an organised Isis terror cell of just 25 people, but it’s enough to carry out a couple of atrocities in the UK on a scale of that seen in Brussels and France.

Back in the EU corridors of power, Commissioner Moscovici eventually gets his way. We have to put VAT on children’s clothes, medicine and food – hitting kids, the sick and the poor hardest. We get a Financial Transaction Tax which makes our financial services uncompetitive. Jobs leak from the City to Switzerland or America. That costs us tens of billions of pounds in tax revenue; your taxes rise to pay for it. Other EU nations shrug their shoulders; only the UK is so heavily reliant on financial services.

The Dublin II rules on immigration and asylum are repealed, leading to another mass movement of people to Britain. It is only a few years before Turkey joins the European Union, giving it a land border with Syria and unlimited movement of people to the UK.

Our heavy industry continues to decline and eventually gives up the ghost due in large part to astronomical energy prices caused by EU policy, and EU state aid rules.

The pollution is exported to India and China, increasing global CO2 emissions. Our healthcare system is opened up to private competition through large US corporations after the TTIP deal is signed, and we soon see US companies taking the British government to court whenever they dislike our policies.

The moves towards an EU Army step up a gear. Angela Merkel once famously said Cameron would only get his EU ‘deal’ if he dropped opposition to an EU army. It turns out that was his secret deal for getting his pot of stew during the negotiations. With the UK’s military capacity declining, we lose our seat on the UN Security Council. We’re replaced by an EU seat and our influence declines.

More and more businesses go bust thanks to EU red tape. By 2020 we’re begging for another referendum, another chance to leave, but nobody in the political class is prepared to give us another chance to regain our freedom. We’re trapped.

Will everything mentioned in this article actually happen if we vote to stay in the European Union? I can’t say, but it’s far more credible than the nonsense threats being made by the ‘Remain’ camp.

This article was originally published in The Journal.  You can view it online here.

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