PRESS-RELEASE

Brexit vote having positive impact on the North East

Figures showing a staggering 20,000 drop in the North East unemployment rate, with just 79,000 now out of work, demonstrates that the Brexit vote is already having a positive impact on the region, said UKIP’s local Euro-MP Jonathan Arnott.

The figures represent the fastest fall in the United Kingdom, with the North East having halved the gap between the UK and the national average in just a few months.

“The disconnection between establishment politicians trying to sabotage Brexit and the impact we’re already seeing here is phenomenal,” he said.

“The bottom line is that we have more people in work. I’ve been pointing out for years that the gap between the North East and the rest of the country has been growing, but something big has changed since June.

“We’ve got used to seeing an unemployment rate hovering around 8%, and today’s news puts it at just 6.1%. We’ve seen a string of businesses keen to invest here, and that’s really making a difference.

“Whilst our politicians in Westminster lament the weaker pound, it has been absolutely vital for our beleaguered manufacturing industry in the North East. It’s provided the shot in the arm that our economy so desperately needed. We are a manufacturing region, and Brexit is making our manufacturing more competitive.

“Let’s remember that the Remain campaign predicted immediate economic disaster over the summer. They couldn’t have been more wrong. But I’m yet to hear a single one of our Labour MPs admit that, in fact, the vote has already proved to be fantastic news for the North East.

“We’re seeing winds of change amongst working-class people here; since the Brexit vote there is genuine hope in our communities which have been abandoned and ignored for years by an out-of-touch Labour Party.

“Today’s news means food on the table and money in the bank for local families, a fantastic boost as we get closer to Christmas. Not all of our economic ills can be cured overnight, but this is a massive step in the right direction.”

The drop in the North East was higher than any other region in the country, and accounted for more than half of the total national fall in unemployment.

We must ensure that our government gives our veterans all the support and resources that they require and deserve

Dear Editor,

I am writing this letter on Armistice Day, while observing the traditional silence at 11am I could not help but think about just how many people made sacrifices so that our nation could remain free and secure.  Indeed, many of those people live and work alongside us today.

I would simply like to take this opportunity to thank all of your readers who have served in our armed forces over the years.

Sadly, the last few decades have seen the UK get involved in numerous wars and whilst we must never forget the sacrifice of the soldiers who fought in the wars of the 20th Century, we must also ensure we do not overlook the sacrifice of those who have most recently died and fought in our armed forces.  Since the turn of the Millennium we have lost many brave soldiers and to this day countless others continue to deal with injuries suffered while serving their country.

We must never forget this sacrifice and we must ensure that our government gives our veterans all the support and resources that they require and deserve.

Regards,

Jonathan Arnott MEP

PRESS-RELEASEV2

Money saving proposals rejected by EU

Proposals by UKIP which would have saved more than €3.4 billion taxpayers money have been thrown out by the EU.

“This is how the European Union operates – spend, spend, spend and to hell with the cost, as it not coming out of over-paid bureaucrats’ pockets,” said Jonathan Arnott, UKIP’s North East MEP.

“We put 33 eminently sensible money saving proposals forward to the budget committee and one by one they have been rejected. Sadly this came as no great surprise as the EU’s ethos is to keep expanding as it is a money-gobbling machine on the road to destruction.

“Our proposals included cutting MEP salaries, travel expenses and their assistants budget  – so no great shock that they got the thumbs down!”, he said.

The other cost saving suggestions included – scrapping the Economic and Monetary Union propaganda campaign; cutting commissioners salaries; scrapping the EU House of History; cutting the Monnet professor budget and cutting funding for more countries to join the EU, e.g. Turkey.

“The Parliament’s attitude to the proposals is further proof – not that we really need more – that the UK’s vote for Brexit was absolutely the right decision.

“Some people ask these days what is the point of UKIP now we have had the referendum and the answer is we must hold the government’s feet to the fire to make sure that Britain’s exit from this failing bloc happens sooner rather than later. Every day that goes by continues to cost us £55 million a day,” said Mr Arnott.

Nissan news welcomed by Jonathan Arnott MEP

News that the Nissan Qashqai and X-Trail models will be built at Nissan’s Sunderland plant, securing in the region of 7,000 jobs, has been welcomed by local UKIP MEP Jonathan Arnott.

Whilst the Qashqai decision had been expected, the X-Trail was more of a surprise.

Almost one-third of all cars made in the UK last year were made at the Sunderland plant.

Jonathan Arnott said “I am absolutely delighted that these jobs have been secured and this is fantastic news not just for Nissan workers, but also for those working in jobs in the supply chain.

“This is a real much needed boost to the local economy.

“I wonder how long it will be before we hear the words ‘despite Brexit’ from those naysayers and doom-mongers who downplay every success and magnify every failure in an attempt to sabotage the will of the people and British prosperity.

“They were not slow to try to weaponise Nissan in their fight against the referendum result and this is one in the eye for them. They ought to reflect upon the jeopardy in which they place British jobs when they do so.

“This news is not just good news for the North East but the whole country as I have no doubt that the confidence shown by Nissan will be reflected by other companies,” said Mr Arnott.

PRESS-RELEASEV2

An EU employee has been put on leave and given €18,000 per month

An “appalling money for nothing” scheme for EU employees taking early retirement has been highlighted by UKIP.

The issue has come to light after approval was given this week for an employee to be put on leave and given €18,000 per month potentially for five years.

The unnamed staff member currently earns €12,000 a month but an amendment passed by the EU Budget Committee involves not only a larger sum but it will be classed as an allowance.

And at the employee’s request he will continue to pay into the organisation’s generous pension scheme.  He has been placed on leave “in the interests of the service” effective from December 1.

According to the Staff statutes, 5% of all EU staff eligible for retirement, can get full pay for doing nothing up to a maximum of five years.

Jonathan Arnott, North East UKIP MEP, said, “For this individual to be paid this staggering amount of money and then be explicitly asked to do nothing flies in the face of hard-working Brits who do a proper day’s work for their money.

“To pay them more than the Prime Minister to do nothing is appalling – but then getting value for British tax-payer’s money has never been a high priority for the EU which is a bonfire of taxpayers’ hard-earned cash.

“I have written to the Secretariat to ask for clarification about exactly how much taxpayers’ money is involved in this case, and will be grilling the Commission to find out how much money is being spent to keep other officials on similar money-for-nothing schemes.”

How many more innocent animals must die before our government will act?

Dear Editor,

Writing this letter reminds me of the film Groundhog Day:until Phil the weatherman learns his lesson, he’s doomed to repeat the same day of his life over and over again. I write once again about a cruel attack on an animal, this time near Redcar. These offences are not only far too common, but they are not taken seriously enough by our criminal justice system.

Current laws are woefully inadequate, with maximum sentences of under a year in jail for any animal cruelty offence. Even some of the most horrific of offences often do not result in a custodial sentence.

Parliament must act to increase the maximum sentences for animal cruelty. Sentencing guidelines need to be change so that those who torture animals for pleasure expect to go to prison.

It’s rare that I, as a UKIP MEP, will be heard praising Labour politicians. But I was immensely pleased to hear Anna Turley MP (Redcar) call for tougher sentences in Parliament this week and hope that more MPs will treat this important issue with the seriousness and gravity that it deserves.

Society has a responsibility to those who do not have a voice of their own, and the treatment of animals is no exception; these animal welfare issues should never be ignored. How many more innocent animals must die before our government will act?

Regards,

Jonathan Arnott MEP

PRESS-RELEASE

Crime rises across the North East

Newly released figures showing that crime is up in the North East paint a “very worrying picture” said the region’s UKIP MEP Jonathan Arnott.

The figures revealed by Office of National Statistics show that across the region the number of recorded crimes, excluding fraud, are up by by 24%. by 190,022.

The breakdown shows that at 35% Northumbria has the highest crime increase in any police force area in England and Wales against 2015. In Durham the rise has been 19% and Cleveland 11%.

“These figures paint a worrying picture in a time when a Conservative government is continuing to make cuts to our police forces,” said Mr Arnott.

“It surely demonstrates that you cannot just keep on cutting back on public services such as our vital police forces, because eventually something has to give.

“The public rightly expect that they should be safe in their homes and on the streets and these figures tend to undermine that expectation.

“The North East tops the league in unemployment figures and that inevitably has a knock on effect on crime figures as desperate people can be driven to desperate measures, although undoubtedly the vast majority are law abiding individuals.

It’s time to get touch on crime,” he added.

 

Soruce:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/bulletins/crimeinenglandandwales/yearendingjune2016

LETTERS

I can’t speak for the ‘IN’ campaign, but this is not what I would call ‘value for money.’

Dear Editor,

The ‘IN’ campaign have spent the last year claiming the EU represents excellent value for UK taxpayers. Last week the EU Court of Auditors released its annual report – here are a few examples of what it revealed about EU spending:

–  A youth club that may not actually exist was given €16,500.

– A €250,000 euro grant was used to pay staff for hours they didn’t work, and give them bonuses that they weren’t entitled to.

– In just one member state €152 million in animal welfare payments were found to be ineligible.

– A €4,000 mountain bike, a €10,000 donation to a local church and a €3,500 panoramic spyglass were claimed for as part of an €80,000 spending spree on unnecessary items.

– Part of a grant for SMEs in the UK was never passed on to SMEs

I can’t speak for the ‘IN’ campaign, but this is not what I would call ‘value for money.’

Regards,

Jonathan Arnott MEP

UKIP, North East

Court of Auditors Report 2015 – the silliest examples of waste

The European Union’s Court of Auditors has failed to give the accounts a clean bill of health for the 22nd year in a row. The report, which can be read here, blasts the payments underlying the accounts as being ‘materially affected by error’, leading the Court to issue an adverse opinion on the legality and regularity of the payments underlying the accounts. An adverse opinion is rare in accountancy, and is issued only in serious cases where there has been a substantial departure from generally accepted accounting principles.

In the 320-page report, the Court of Auditors blasted various examples of EU waste and mismanagement. But the Court of Auditor’s findings only told a small part of the true scale of EU wastefulness, because only a small sample of all expenditure is scrutinised by the Court. There are undoubtedly many similar examples which will simply never be found. The error rate is 3.8%, almost double the 2% threshold which is the maximum considered acceptable by the Court of Auditors, affecting a whopping €5.4 billion of EU spending.

UKIP MEP Jonathan Arnott, a member of the EP’s budget control committee said: “It’s a good thing that the British people voted to leave the European Union when we did because the levels of waste and bureaucracy are absolutely breath-taking. That’s the nature of a system that simply isn’t fit for purpose.

“These examples of waste would make you think the EU is being run by ‘Count Von Count’ from Sesame Street. Taxpayers’ money is being wasted left, right and centre, the EU has obviously lost control of the money tap. I am sure that when we’re outside the EU we can cut waste, when we can cut out the middleman and look after our own businesses ourselves.”

Some examples of the problems that are highlighted by the report are below (n.b. the page number corresponds to the page numbers in the actual report, not the page numbers on the Adobe Reader):

1. The Commission committed to more expenditure last year than it did in any previous year in history. (p53)

2. The European Union’s liabilities now exceed its assets by a huge €72.4 billion. Last year the deficit was a further €10.3 billion. (p15)

3. The error rate for Economic, Social and Territorial Cohesion was much higher, at a massive 5.2%. This is partly explained (p147) by Commission failings: “In 16 cases of quantifiable errors, the Commission, national authorities or independent auditors had sufficient information to prevent, or detect and correct the errors before accepting the expenditure.” [Note: this is 16 cases from the Court of Auditor’s sample, not from the whole EU accounts]. This does not include projects which were effectively money wasted.

4. There is not yet any procedure in place to ensure that projects actually provide value for money, or that they have been used in the way that they were intended.

5. Even within the Horizon 2020 project, where some performance indicators do exist, the Court of Auditors blasts the structure of the spending, stating “The mechanics of Horizon 2020 do not consistently drive a focus on performance”

6. The European Union fines member states if projects fail to breach the rules. But instead of using the money to deal with unpaid bills, the European Union has spent the money on additional projects (p53, footnote 12)

7. Other ‘amending budgets’ throughout the year cost the taxpayer an additional €500 million.

8. A €4,000 mountain bike, a €10,000 donation to a local church and a €3,500 panoramic spyglass were claimed for in Italy as part of an €80,000 spending spree on unnecessary items for a project. (p238)

9. A youth club in Azerbaijan was given €16,500 but the Court of Auditors was unable to actually trace the youth club, leading to fears that the money had disappeared altogether (p260).

10. The Court of Auditors points out that many objectives for EU funding aren’t properly set out. For example (p107): ‘To secure investment for climate related issues’ is not specific as it does not indicate the volume of investment to be secured, and it is not time-bound as there is no deadline to achieve it.

11. Some projects (p108) were designed to achieve results but were defined by the amount of money put in: “Indicators presented as result indicators but were instead input-oriented, for example in DG AGRI ‘Total investment in renewable energy production’ — This indicator measures the activity directly realised by the intervention instead of focusing on the increase in renewable energy resulting from the investment.”

12. The Court of Auditors states that when countries found themselves in financial difficulties, “warning signs went unnoticed by the Commission, with the result that it found itself unprepared when requests for financial assistance started to arrive” (p110)

13. A €250,000 euro grant for cloud computing services (p149) was used to pay staff for hours they didn’t work, and give them bonuses that they weren’t entitled to.

14. Part of a grant for SMEs in the UK (p170) was never passed on to SMEs. In the Czech Republic (p171) similar funding was given without first checking that it was actually going to a small business.

15. In Germany (p173) the cost of building a road was claimed under regional development funding, giving over 50% of the job to a single company without following EU procurement rules.

16. Seven projects which breached EU state aid rules (p175) were EU-funded. EU state aid rules have hampered the UK, for example making it more difficult for us to help our steel industry to survive, but the EU itself is effectively paying countries to breach those rules.

17. In Hungary (p182) a company claimed EU funds, which it then loaned to another company in its own group.

18. European Agricultural Guarantee Fund (EAGF) – (Includes the direct aid ‘Single Payment Scheme’ (SPS), 29.3 billion euro in 2015, and ‘Single Area Payment Scheme’ (SAPS), 7.8 billion euro in 2015.)

The huge CAP funds were found to have errors, the main reason being that EU funds were being granted for areas of land that were reported larger than they actually were. These errors were found in 12 of the 18 Member States investigated. (Page 215)

19. In Spain a case was found where 48 hectares of land had wrongfully been granted money when a portion of it was clearly not in use. (p216)

20. In France the authorities approved EU funds for grazable land but examples were found that these in part or in full were not eligible due to some of the land being forested or otherwise clearly un-grazable. (p217)

21. In Romania it was found up to 152 million euros in animal welfare payments were ineligible (page 220)

22. In Slovakia (p237) a company charged to the EU the cost of building materials at 6 times the going rate.

23. In Italy nearly €100,000 was awarded for building dry stone walls which the Court says had no link to any EU objectives (Page 240)

24. In Mozambique an agency claimed €874,309 for office and lab supplies, but no documentation or proof was provided for these items (p303)

25. According to the Commission only 58% of the expenditure declared for the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), Cohesion Fund (CF) and European Social Fund (ESF) operational programmes (OP) were “free of a material level of error”. (p188)

PRESS-RELEASEV2

The Great Exhibition of the North will hopefully be a terrific boost for the locality and the wider region

The announcement that Newcastle and Gateshead have been selected to host a major exhibition of art, design and innovation is positive news.

This Great Exhibition of the North will hopefully be a terrific boost for the locality and the wider region – and heaven knows it needs it.

The idea for this exhibition in 2018 is part of George Osborne’s ‘Northern Powerhouse’ and it is estimated it will attract three million visitors.

It sounds good on paper but one of the greatest problems facing the North East is its transport links which need urgent improvement, even more so with so many potential visitors heading our way to this 77 day show.

We all know that such major infrastructure developments take planning, time and a lot of money and so far all the Northern Powerhouse has produced is hype. Meanwhile the North East is languishing behind the rest of the country and lovely though this exhibition could be we need massive investment and permanent jobs.